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Cats

  • Seeking guidance before obtaining a new pet can prevent many behavior and health problems in pets. Such a consultation will help you select the best pet for the household, but also provide information on how to prepare in advance for the new arrival.

  • Most animals are genetically wired to spend a certain amount of time on activities that meet their requirements for survival. For most domestic pets, particularly dogs and cats, these requirements include opportunities to play, explore their environment, rest, socialize, acquire and eat food, and eliminate.

  • There are a number of products on the market that can help with behavior management. Any products listed below are meant to be helpful suggestions, but please note that we are not affiliated with, nor do we specifically endorse any particular brand or product.

  • Tellington TTouch® was developed by Linda Tellington-Jones as a method of behavioral modification and animal treatment without the use of force. Today, it is used on animals and people to reduce tension and also treat some stress related problems.

  • Benazepril is given by mouth and is used on and off label to treat heart failure, high blood pressure, chronic kidney disease, protein-losing glomerulonephropathies, and idiopathic kidney bleeding. Side effects may include vomiting, diarrhea, and lack of appetite. Do not use in pets that are allergic to it or other ACE inhibitors. If a negative reaction occurs, please call your veterinary office.

  • Fibrous tumors, including hamartomas, are a group of benign tumors arising from fibrous and fibrous-like tissues. Nodular dermatofibrosis can be secondary to (or a consequence of) tumors in the kidney or uterus. Fibrous tumors can develop as the result of underlying, repeated trauma (e.g., pressure on the elbows when lying on hard surfaces and self-trauma with skin allergies). Therefore, once a diagnosis has been made, determining and understanding the underlying cause is important.

  • Bethanechol chloride is given by mouth or injection and is used off label to increase urinary or intestinal movement/activity. Give this medication as directed by your veterinarian. Common side effects include vomiting, diarrhea, drooling, and lack of appetite. Do not use in pets that are allergic to it, or have urinary obstruction, stomach ulcers, gastrointestinal obstructions, intestinal inflammation, or recent intestinal, stomach, or bladder surgery. If a negative reaction occurs, please call your veterinary office.

  • Bilberry is an over the counter supplement given by mouth, and is used off label to treat conditions of the eyes, heart and blood vessels, diabetes, and tumors. Give as directed by your veterinarian. There are no known side effects, but information is limited. There are no known contraindications. Certain medications should be used with caution in combination with bilberry. If a negative reaction occurs, please call your veterinary office.

  • Bile acids are made in the liver, released into the intestine to help digest fat, and are reabsorbed into the bloodstream. They can be measured in the blood to determine if the liver is working properly. Indications for the test include elevated liver enzymes, seizures, poor growth, and low blood albumin. The test is usually performed after a 12 hour fast and consists of the measurement of serum bile acids before and 2 hours after a meal. The test can be affected by poor intestinal motility – either from disease, sedation/anesthesia, or if the pet has had part of the intestine removed that is responsible for absorption of bile acids. Bile acids will be high if the liver is not functioning properly. It does not rule out liver disease as disease can affect part of the liver without significantly affecting bile acid production. Elevated bile acids may warrant further diagnostics or monitoring depending on your pet’s condition.

  • Biological response modifiers (BRMs) are naturally occurring substances that are used to treat diseases or infections by affecting the immune system and how it works. They are mostly used to treat some cancers, immune-mediated diseases, or infections. Most BRMs are administered in the hospital under veterinary supervision. Side effects vary but may include fever, stomach upset, tiredness, or allergic reactions.